everyone's harvest

Transforming our food system, one sustainable blog at a time

Sustainable and Delicious Cooking: Penne Pasta with Vegetables, Fresh Herbs, Walnuts and Mozzarella November 29, 2012

 

Blog by Chiara Cabiglio, Everyone’s Harvest Intern

 

On November 18, 2012, Chef Valerie Kazansky (aka the Carmel Cooking Coach) taught enthusiastic eaters at Everyone’s

Harvest’s Marina Certified Farmers’ Market how to make healthy and delicious Croatian Penne Pasta with Vegetables, Fresh

Herbs, Walnuts and Mozzarella.

 

Healthy interactive cooking workshops for families take place at Everyone’s Harvest Certified Farmers’ Markets. The

workshops are part of Everyone’s Harvest Edible Education for Healthy Youth program. Grant-sponsored by the Nancy Buck

Ransom Foundation, MC Gives and Project 17, the workshops are free to the public and participants receive market vouchers

to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables to prepare a healthy dish at home. Everyone’s Harvest’s goal is to promote healthy

eating.

 

Please join us for our upcoming 2013 cooking workshops! Stay tuned for more information to see

when/where here.

 

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO PARTICIPATED!

 

***RECIPE***

 

Ingredients:
-1/2 lb penne pasta, cooked
-2 to 3 cups eggplant (can substitute other vegetables)
-1 tbsp olive oil
-1 medium yellow onion
-2 to 3 cloves garlic
-4 to 5 medium tomatoes, chopped into ½ inch pieces
-1 to 2 tbsp tomato paste (optional)
-white wine
-zucchini or yellow crookneck squash
-red bell pepper
-1/4 cup each chopped Italian parsley and chopped fresh basil
-2 to 3 ounces Mozzarella cheese, cut into small pieces
-1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
-3 to 4 tbsp walnuts, chopped

 

Directions:
-peel the eggplant and cut into ¼ inch rounds. Cut the rounds into inch pieces. You can sprinkle with salt and let stand for

30 minutes. This step is not mandatory, but helps remove some bitterness.
-sauté the eggplant in olive oil until tender. Remove from skillet. Sauté the onions and garlic in the olive oil.
-add the tomatoes and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, until juices come out to form a sauce. If it seems watery, then add tomato

paste. Set aside.

-sauté the squash and the red bell pepper until tender.
-add the tomatoes and eggplant to the squash and bell pepper.
-after all the vegetables are warm, add the fresh herbs. Toss with the cooked pasta and mozzarella cheese. Cook over low heat

until heated through. Spinkle with parmesan and chopped walnuts.

You can substitute any of the vegetables in this recipe with a vegetable that you would prefer. If you like the vegetables cooked

very well done, steam or sauté first.

 

Nutrition Facts:

Makes 4 servings
Per serving: 300 calories, 15 g fat, 5 g saturated fat, 20 mg cholesterol, 230 mg sodium, 27 g carbohydrate, 6 g fiber, 7.5 g sugar, 12.6 g protein

 

 

Vote With Your Fork to Reverse Climate Change November 14, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — everyonesharvest @ 9:11 pm

Image

 

FEATURED ARTICLE: We Could Be Heroes

 

DISCLAIMER: the following content does not necessarily represent the beliefs, values and opinions of Everyone’s

Harvest as a whole. These blog posts are written by individuals associated with this organization and are their

personal views of food and our food systems. The sole purpose and mission of Everyone’s Harvest remains the same:

to create vibrant, healthy communities and equitable food webs.” 

 

Blog by Chiara Cabiglio, Everyone’s Harvest Intern and University of California, Santa Cruz Alumna

 

Ignoring climate change simply is not an option for us anymore. Superstorm Sandy, a storm that was largely

intensified by climate change, is responsible for at least 193 human deaths in the U.S. and the Caribbean and an

estimated US $50 billion in costs.

 

With President Obama emerging triumphant in the November 6th election, the pressure on him to take the lead in addressing

not only the nation’s “Fiscal Cliff,” but also the world’s “Climate Cliff,” is now more intense than ever. However, President

Obama is only one man. He is not God or Superman. In regards to climate change and environmental conservation, “Obama

has passed no truly ambitious legislation related to climate change, shying from battle in the face of relentless opposition

from congressional Republicans. Yet his environmental record is not as barren as it may seem. The stimulus bill provided for

extensive investment in green energy, biofuels, and electric cars. In August, the Administration instituted new fuel-efficiency

standards that should nearly double gas mileage; by 2025, new cars will need to average 54.5 miles per gallon.”

 

But reversing climate change is not a task left only to Obama and Washington. It is the global responsibility of us all. On

election day Mark Bittman, the American food journalist and author, posted the following on his Facebook page: ‘“It looks

like I’m going to have to retire. In this column I said this: ‘The purely pragmatic reasons to eat less meat (and animal

products in general) are abundant. And while I’ve addressed them before, I’ll continue until the floods come to Manhattan.’ 

Well, they’ve come. Now what?”’

 

Now what? We become heroes by voting with our forks and dollars. By choosing organic fruit, vegetables, grains and

legumes over meat and dairy. By choosing better meat and dairy alternatives over livestock products. Why? Because according

to Robert Goodland and Jeff Anhang, Environmental Specialists employed by two UN specialized agencies, the World Bank

and International Finance Corporation, the lifecycle and supply chain of livestock products is actually responsible for at least

51 percent of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas.

 

In Goodland’s most recent post, he claims that “…the key player in reversing climate change – at least in the next four years -

is actually the food industry. It is more exposed to climate change than any other industry, so it has a compelling commercial

incentive to reverse climate change. Food corporations develop better foods as a matter of course. They control lots of land on

which livestock and feed production can be reduced, and they can sell carbon credits from reforesting land. Consumers have

an equal role in their capacity to vote with their forks to replace livestock products (meat, dairy and egg products) with better

alternatives.”

 

Imagine the positive impact we could have on reversing climate change through the individual and collective power of

changing what we eat. The power is in our hands (or in this case, our dollars and forks) to prevent another superstorm like

Hurricane Sandy in the future. The power is in our utensils to save the polar bears and other species from extinction, and to

enable our children and grandchildren to inherit a safer and more just world. As soon as we recognize this power within us,

we can begin to create positive change – and at the same time, change the world by eating deliciously sustainable food.

Instead of waiting for another superstorm to happen, why not do what we can to prevent another devastating tragedy?

 

If we want to save the polar bears and other species from extinction due to global climate change, habitat loss and

environmental degradation, and if we want to save ourselves, then humanity must wake up and change the way it

eats, the way our food is produced and what food is produced. Period.

 

 

Superstorm Sandy: What if storms like this can be prevented (by changing what we eat)? November 1, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — everyonesharvest @ 7:09 pm

 

DISCLAIMER: the following content does not necessarily represent the beliefs, values and opinions of Everyone’s

Harvest as a whole. These blog posts are written by individuals associated with this organization and are their

personal views of food and our food systems. The sole purpose and mission of Everyone’s Harvest remains the same:

to create vibrant, healthy communities and equitable food webs.” 

 

Blog by Chiara Cabiglio, Everyone’s Harvest Intern and University of California, Santa Cruz Alumna

 

Superstorm Sandy has caused at least 157 human deaths as of midday November 1st.  Its impacts include flooding of

lower Manhattan and large swaths of New York City’s subway system.   News reports had previously predicted that such

events might occur only in 2080, based on a 2011 New York State government report.

 

Reporters and scientists are exploring whether climate change might have intensified Superstorm Sandy. Hurricanes would

occur even in the absence of climate change. But scientists are connecting Sandy’s intensity with the same climate disruption

that generated record drought in the summer of 2012, which caused “severe pain” among both crop-growers and livestock

farmers.  Similarly, scientists are warning that Sandy could yield “life-threatening” results among poultry flocks on the East

Coast.

 

In fact, while livestock are victims of climate change, they also are largely responsible for it, according to a wide range of

sources.  Whatever the role of fossil fuels, at least 20 years and $18 trillion are needed to construct enough renewable energy

infrastructure to start reversing climate change – while one expert group after another say we must start reversing climate

change in the next 5 years or it’ll be too late.

 

So the only pragmatic way left to reverse climate change before it’s too late, say World Bank environmental advisor Robert

Goodland and his colleague Jeff Anhang, is through large-scale reforestation and regeneration of forest to absorb today’s

excess atmospheric carbon – combined with replacing at least 25% of today’s livestock products with better alternatives

(notably, meat substitutes).  That way, lots of greenhouse gas emissions attributable to livestock would be significantly

reduced at the same time as new trees would sequester excess atmospheric carbon.

 

Yet many people still think that sustainability in food is achieved by buying “organic” or “grass-fed” meat.  However, grass-

fed cows emit up to 400% more methane than do grain-fed cows, and they take up much more land, so they yield much

less forest available to absorb atmospheric carbon. Anyway, most marketing of “grass-fed” beef is a scam  –  and that’s

according to a “grass-fed” producer who touts himself as a rare, honest marketer of grass-fed meat.  Yet that producer can’t

show his buyers any better certification than can his competitors who he says are scammers.

 

Indeed, any producer can keep animals on grass all day long – but then when night falls and it’s hard to observe, quickly feed

them grain.  There’s no practical way to certify that an animal has been 100% grass-fed unless an independent observer

would watch each animal 24/7.  But of course it’ll never be close to economically possible to do so.  Yet the premium for meat

marketed as grass-fed is commonly 200-300%.  So there’s an overwhelming incentive for a producer to cheat.

 

Meanwhile, some people promote Meat Free Mondays.  Yet since that campaign began in 2003, survey data show a sharp

drop in the number of Americans consuming less meat – even though meat consumption has historically fallen during

economic downturns.  Meatless Monday’s own website provides a reason for such failure:  its framing of the issue is

anachronistic, based on World War I deprivation.  In fact, when people are asked to sacrifice something one day, they often

crave it more the next day.

 

Indeed, no consumer product is ever successfully marketed by asking consumers to use it just one day a week.  For example,

little to no Pepsi-Cola would be sold by prodding consumers to drink it one day a week, conceding that Coca-Cola remains the

drink of choice the rest of the week.  It’s been suggested that a campaign would do better by being based on the value of

products that are better than meat.

 

Some people debate whether Goodland and Anhang’s estimate that at least 51% of human-caused greenhouse gas is

attributable to livestock may be too high, and prefer to use the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) 18% estimate –

even though the FAO promotes more factory farming, not less, and has partnered with the meat industry to prove it.

The validity of Goodland and Anhang’s conclusion can be grasped simply by considering the estimate by the International

Livestock Research Institute – which normally promotes livestock – that 45% of land on earth is now used for livestock and

feed production.

 

That so much land is used for livestock and feed production suggests it’s correct for Goodland and Anhang to conclude that

replacing 25% of today’s livestock products with better alternatives would both reduce emissions and allow forest to

regenerate on a vast amount of land, which could then absorb excess atmospheric carbon to reduce it to a safe level. This may

be the only pragmatic way to reverse climate change in the next 5 years as needed, and avert future superstorms like

Hurricane Sandy.

 

Therefore, the food industry may be the key player in determining whether climate change is reversed or not. Consumers have

the power to create positive change in the food industry by voting with their forks: by replacing meat and dairy products with

meat and dairy alternatives, in particular by choosing more grains, legumes, fruit and vegetables.

 

If we ignore Mother Earth’s warning this time, then it could prove utterly catastrophic for us all. If we want to save ourselves

from climate change, then we must consider changing the way we eat, the way our food is produced, and what food is

produced. Period.

 

 

Let Me Introduce You to Delicious Solutions to Today’s Global Problems… October 22, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — everyonesharvest @ 6:30 pm

 

FEATURED RECIPES: Organic Butternut Squash Stuffed with Chard and White Beans and Organic Cashew Cream and Spinach Stuffed Portobellos

 

MORE RECIPES: Vegetarian Fall Meals

 

DISCLAIMER: the following content does not necessarily represent the beliefs, values and opinions of Everyone’s

Harvest as a whole. These blog posts are written by individuals associated with this organization and are their

personal views of food and our food systems. The sole purpose and mission of Everyone’s Harvest remains the same:

to create vibrant, healthy communities and equitable food webs.” 

 

Blog by Chiara Cabiglio, Everyone’s Harvest Intern

 

Fall. The leaves are turning, the air is chilling, and the colors are vibrant orange, burgundy, and gold. Oh, how glorious

autumn is! Pumpkins and squash galore, I love fall because of this season’s produce. Because you can make virtually

anything out of a pumpkin: pumpkin soup, pumpkin pie, pumpkin scones, pumpkin bread, pumpkin muffins, and there

equally are so many things you can do with other squash as well: pasta made out of spaghetti squash, soups, and so on and

so forth. The first featured recipe I found is entirely unique in that it uses the squash in the same way you would use a bread

bowl filled with soup and/or goodies inside. The second featured recipe does the same thing, except with portobello

mushroom caps.

 

Perhaps the most important and spectacular thing about these recipes is that they are in fact a part of the solution to climate

change, environmental degradation, health care, obesity, diabetes, cancer and other diseases, overfishing, energy, global

outbreaks such as swine flu, global depletion, world hunger, species extinction, animal cruelty, and much more. These

recipes, including the Fresh Veggie Rolls with Mango Salsa and Savory Almond Dipping Sauce recipe, enable us to live and

eat consciously, sustainably and simply so that others may simply live. So that the human race and future generations may

simply live, as well as the polar bears and thousands of other species that currently are on the brink of extinction. The clock 

is ticking. Imagine if more people ate this way. Imagine if more people ate less meat, fish and dairy, and/or replaced these

with better alternatives. Individually and collectively, we would create positive change and see Mother Earth begin to heal.

 

So let me introduce you to an utterly delicious solution to many of the world’s problems: it’s called Organic Butternut

Squash Stuffed with Chard and White Beans.

 

 

Ingredients:

*2 medium organic butternut or acorn squash from your local farmers’ market, halved and seeded

*1 teaspoon(s) organic extra-virgin olive oil

*2 tablespoon(s) organic extra-virgin olive oil

*1/2 teaspoon(s) salt, divided

*1/2 teaspoon(s) freshly ground pepper, divided

*1/2 cup(s) chopped organic onion from your local farmers’ market

*2 clove(s) organic garlic from your local farmers’ market, minced

*2 tablespoon(s) water

*1 tablespoon(s) organic tomato paste or organic tomato sauce

*8 cup(s) (about 1 large bunch of organic chard) chopped organic chard leaves from your local farmers’ market

*1 can(s) (15-ounce) organic white beans, rinsed (better yet, purchase uncooked organic white beans and cook them yourself

in a crockpot!)

*1/4 cup(s) chopped organic kalamata olives

*1/3 cup(s) coarse dry whole-grain organic breadcrumbs (I made my own breadcrumbs from my favorite bread from Whole

Foods, French Meadow Bakery’s Organic Healthseed SPELT Bread, by grinding the bread up in a food processor. You can

also crumble the bread with your hands.)

*1/3 cup(s) grated Parmesan cheese (try to buy organic or without hormones)

 

Directions:

Cut a small slice off the bottom of each squash half so it rests flat. Brush the insides with 1 teaspoon oil; sprinkle with 1/4

teaspoon each salt and pepper. Place in a 9-by-13-inch (or similar-size) microwave-safe dish. Cover  and microwave on High

until the squash is fork-tender, about 12 minutes. Once the squash is finished cooking, scoop out enough flesh next to the

hole from the seeds to make enough room for the stuffing. Reserve the flesh and eat with the meal when it is ready.

 

Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion; cook, stirring, until starting to brown, 2 to

3 minutes. Add garlic; cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in water, tomato paste and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon each salt and

pepper. Stir in chard, cover and cook until tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in white beans and olives; cook until heated through, 1

to 2 minutes more. Remove from the heat.

 

Position rack in center of oven; preheat broiler.

 

Combine breadcrumbs, Parmesan, and the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a bowl. Fill each squash half with about 1 cup of the

chard mixture. Place in a baking pan or on a baking sheet. Sprinkle with the breadcrumb mixture. Broil in the center of the

oven until the breadcrumbs are browned, 1 to 2 minutes.

 

Now that I’ve introduced you to my good old friend Stuffed Squash, let me also introduce you to an equally mouth-watering

solution that also creates positive change: it’s called Organic Cashew Cream and Spinach Stuffed Portobellos. The

original recipe calls for ricotta cheese, but trust me on this one, the cashew cream tastes just as rich and creamy and is better

for you and the planet!

 

 

Ingredients:

*4 large organic Portobello mushroom caps from your local farmers’ market

*1/4 teaspoon(s) salt

*1/4 teaspoon(s) freshly ground pepper, divided

*1 cup organic cashews, soaked in water for at least an hour

*6 tablespoons organic almond milk

*1 tablespoon organic lemon juice

*1 cup(s) finely chopped raw organic spinach

*1/2 cup(s) finely shredded Parmesan cheese, divided (try to buy organic or without hormones)

*2 tablespoon(s) finely chopped organic kalamata olives

*1/2 teaspoon(s) organic Italian seasoning (I used organic chopped basil – fresh and/or dry)

*4 large tablespoons prepared organic marinara sauce

 

Directions for the Cashew Cream:

Drain the 1 cup soaked organic cashews and then puree them in a food processor with about 1 tablespoon organic lemon

juice and 6 tablespoons organic almond milk until completely smooth. It might take up to 5 minutes to get it really smooth.

You may need to add more almond milk if it’s too thick. ***Secret for the organic almond milk: instead of spending $3-4 on

boxed almond milk, save money and make your own like I did using only a tiny amount of organic almonds that you can

purchase at your local farmers’ market! You can buy the almond, soy, and rice milk maker here.

 

Directions for the Organic Cashew Cream and Spinach Stuffed Portobellos:

Preheat oven to 450°F. Coat a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray.

 

Place mushroom caps, gill-side up, on the prepared pan. Sprinkle with salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Roast until tender, 20

to 25 minutes.

 

Meanwhile, mash cashew cream, spinach, 1/4 cup Parmesan, olives, Italian seasoning, and the remaining 1/8 teaspoon

pepper in a medium bowl. Place marinara sauce in a small bowl, cover, and microwave on High until hot, about 30 seconds.

When the mushrooms are tender, carefully pour out any liquid accumulated in the caps. Return the caps to the pan gill-side

up. Spread 1 large tablespoon marinara into each cap. Mound a generous 1/3 cup cashew cream filling into each cap and

sprinkle with the remaining 1/4 cup Parmesan. Bake until hot, about 10 minutes.

 

This conscious way of eating is what will create positive change and heal the world.

After making these recipes, please let us know what you thought of them by commenting below! We’d love to know if you

creatively revised these recipes in any way too! Comment below and start a food conversation! :) Want to try other

scrumptious fall vegetarian recipes? Check these out!

 

 

Polar Bears ‘R Us, Unless We Change September 20, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — everyonesharvest @ 1:14 pm

 

FEATURED BLOG: A Case for Reducing Global Warming Quickly

 

FEATURED ARTICLE: Livestock and Climate Change

 

FEATURED VIDEO: Climate Change 2.0: Chomped if we want it! 

 

DISCLAIMER: the following content does not necessarily represent the beliefs, values and opinions of Everyone’s

Harvest as a whole. These blog posts are written by individuals associated with this organization and are their

personal views of food and our food systems. The sole purpose and mission of Everyone’s Harvest remains the same:

to create vibrant, healthy communities and equitable food webs.” 

 

Blog by Chiara Cabiglio, Everyone’s Harvest Intern and University of California, Santa Cruz Alumna

With Published Articles by Environmental Specialists Robert Goodland and Jeff Anhang

Featuring the Yale Environment 360 article, For Hudson Bay Polar Bears, The End is Already in Sight

 

We need to make bigger and faster changes than most of us think.  In the summer of 2007, scientists focusing on

Greenland were surprised to find almost 40 percent of its surface ice melting, while scientists focusing on polar bears

predicted most of them would disappear by 2050. Five years later, in the summer of 2012, scientists were shocked to find 97

percent of Greenland’s surface ice melting.  So polar bears are now more surely doomed.

 

Yet polar bears are a barometer of larger outcomes.  In 2004, catastrophic flooding of Los Angeles, London and other major

cities was projected to coincide with a full melt of Greenland’s ice sheet – toward the year 2100.  Now that this appears much

more imminent, we may no longer have time to try the old (and failed) strategy to avert climate catastrophe with 18 trillion 

dollars of renewable energy infrastructure installed over the next 20 years.  A new strategy was hinted at in my last post,

which cited an estimate that almost 20 percent of human-caused greenhouse gas is attributable to livestock.

 

But soon after my last post, the Earth Island Journal published an article on how the hidden cost of hamburgers is greater

than commonly reported.  According to this analysis, the lifecycle and supply chain of livestock products is actually

responsible for at least 51 percent of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas.  The authors of this analysis aren’t radicals.  Rather,

they’re environmental specialists employed by the World Bank and International Finance Corporation (two UN specialized

agencies), Robert Goodland and Jeff Anhang.

 

You’ve probably read quite a bit about climate change over time.  But none of what you’ve gotten from your time spent so far

on reading about climate change will compare to the benefit you’ll derive from reading Goodland and Anhang’s “Livestock

and Climate Change.”  If you have a bit more time, then also read their Critical Comments and Responses article.  After

absorbing their analysis, you’ll know why your food choices are more likely to reverse climate change than all your other

“green” choices combined.

 

I used to think that happy grass-fed cows and other livestock raised on small family farms were the environmentally

sustainable method of meat and dairy production.  Indeed, that’s what a majority of activists in the organic and sustainable

food movement believe.  Yet it turns out that livestock on small family farms are in fact less eco-friendly and sustainable and

have a larger carbon footprint than do livestock raised in industrial factory farms.  Dr. Goodland’s Earth Island article cites

conservative sources that report that grass-fed cows emit up to 400 percent as much methane as factory-farmed ones, and

take up much more land – meaning much less forest, and therefore much more carbon absorption forgone.

 

Consider the amount of energy and fossil fuels it takes to raise the approximately 65 billion land animals propagated in 2011

– and the amount of land, which could instead grow trees.  The International Livestock Research Institute, which normally

promotes livestock, estimates that 45 percent of all land on earth is now used for livestock and feed production.  It is no

wonder, then, that the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has risen from 315 parts per million in 1958 to 392

parts per million in August 2012.

 

So here is the key recommendation from Goodland and Anhang’s analysis:  “Replacing at least a quarter of today’s

livestock products with better alternatives would both reduce emissions and allow forest to regenerate on a

vast amount of land, which could then absorb excess atmospheric carbon to reduce it to a safe level.  This

may be the only pragmatic way to reverse climate change in the next five years as needed.”

 

While Goodland and Anhang’s analysis was written primarily for food industry leaders, they also had the general public in

mind.  Indeed, the fix must be created in the crucible where food industry leaders meet the general public, and that’s the

marketplace.  And it’s not about becoming a vegetarian or a vegan, or partaking in “Meatless Mondays,” although there is no

doubt that these efforts will help.  Instead, it’s about performing the same search as we do when we look for any other

winning consumer product.  We look for a superior blend of quality and price, otherwise known as value.  In the case of food,

performing this search consciously will often lead one to try an alternative to a livestock product – especially when one

considers the bonus value of being part of the solution to climate change, which is likely the world’s most serious problem.

 

Love ice cream?  Wait until you try SO Delicious’ Dairy Free Almond Milk chocolate ice cream.  You won’t believe how rich,

creamy and utterly divine it tastes; no need for cow’s milk here!

 

Love chicken?  Beyond Meat produces fake chicken that tastes and looks so much like real chicken that in between each bite,

vegetarians and vegans must remind themselves that they are not eating real chicken.  And if you aren’t too thrilled about the

ingredients, then you can find pre-made veggie burgers made from whole foods, or simply make your own veggie burger,

vegan dish or vegetarian meal at home with lots of vegetables, grains and legumes!  This is a way to eat and live consciously

– and to ensure a future for, well, future generations.

 

In this case, as with any new product, you can be an early adopter or a late one.  But unlike other products, in this case you’re

not likely to have the option of never adopting.  Consider that climate change here today is already decimating cattle

populations – even in their most legendary homes – or that blue-chip financial analysts and a pork producers’ spokesman

have themselves forecast the destruction of the livestock industry, due to growing demand for ethanol.  In other words, if you

approach veggie foods as desirable replacements for obsolete products, then similar to the way it took just a few years until it

became normal to choose a digital TV over a tube TV, your normal new choice in foods should become clear within a few

years.

 

Biz Stone, the creative director for Twitter, explains it this way:  We must  Go Beyond  business as usual and use our human

ingenuity to create and instill new ways of thinking and eating for the masses.  Change will come much less from the car you

drive or the light bulb you use than from what you put in your mouth.

 

Polar bears, my favorite animal ever since I’ve been a little girl, are getting much closer to the end of their existence.

Thousands of other species also are on the brink of extinction.  Thousands of climate change refugees are

becoming more commonplace and are flooding into other countries.  Storms are getting stronger and more frequent.

Summers are getting hotter.  Desertification is occurring much more rapidly in more places.  The lives of many creatures on

this planet are in jeopardy because of our warming climate, and time is running out.  The ability for future generations to live

and their quality of life also is at stake.  What kind of world are they going to inherit from us?  The clock is ticking.

 

“It’s not a lot of fun for somebody who’s spent over 30 years studying polar bears,” says biologist Andrew E. Derocher of the

University of Alberta.  “The first paper I coauthored about this came out in 1993 and at that time I was still under the

impression that even though climate change was a concern it was really going to be for the next generation of biologists — or

perhaps even the one after that — to deal with the issue. And I’ve been really shocked at the rate of change, and I’ve probably

been even more shocked at the lack of concern of political bodies to deal with this… It’s been quite disheartening to watch

this lack of interest, and I think it’s really unfortunate that people don’t understand that we have a limited time to deal with

this issue if we want to save the polar bears.”

 

If we want to save the polar bears and other species from extinction due to global climate change, habitat loss and

environmental degradation, and if we want to save ourselves, then humanity must wake up and change the way it eats, the

way our food is produced and what food is produced. Period.

 

 

Sustainable and Delicious Organic Vegan Veggie Quiche November 30, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — everyonesharvest @ 12:43 am

Image

 

FEATURED RECIPE: Organic Vegan Veggie Quiche

 

DISCLAIMER: the following content does not necessarily represent the beliefs, values and opinions of Everyone’s 

Harvest as a whole. These blog posts are written by individuals associated with this organization and are their personal

views of food and our food systems. The sole purpose and mission of Everyone’s Harvest remains the same: to create

vibrant, healthy communities and equitable food webs.” 

 

Blog by Chiara Cabiglio, Everyone’s Harvest Intern

 

Who says you can’t make a quiche without eggs? This sustainable and delicious recipe uses non-GMO tofu as a substitute for

eggs, and trust me – it tastes just as scrumptious!

 

Not only is this recipe delicious, but it also is sustainable and environmentally friendly. Perhaps the most important and

spectacular thing about this recipe is that it is in fact a part of the solution to climate change, environmental degradation,

health care, obesity, diabetes, cancer and other diseases, overfishing, energy, global outbreaks such as swine flu, global

depletion, world hunger, species extinction, animal cruelty, and much more. This recipe, including the Fresh Veggie Rolls 

with Mango Salsa and Savory Almond Dipping SauceButternut Squash Stuffed with Chard and White BeansCashew Cream

 and Spinach Stuffed Portobellos, Vegan Butternut Mac and Cheese, and Penne Pasta with Vegetables, Fresh Herbs, Walnuts

and Mozzarella recipes, enable us to live and eat consciously, sustainably, compassionately and simply so that others may

simply live. So that the human race and future generations may simply live, as well as the polar bears and thousands of other

species that currently are on the brink of extinction.

 

The clock is ticking. Let’s vote with our forks! Imagine if more people ate this way. Imagine if more people ate less

meat, fish and dairy, and/or replaced these with better alternatives. Individually and collectively, we would create positive

change and see Mother Earth begin to heal.

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 pre-made organic pie crust (try to purchase an organic and whole-grain pie crust)
  • 1 tbsp organic olive oil
  • 1 organic onion, diced (from your local farmers’ market)
  • 1 organic green bell pepper, chopped (from your local farmers’ market)
  • 1 cup chopped organic broccoli (from your local farmers’ market)
  • 1 cup sliced organic mushrooms (from your local farmers’ market)
  • 1 pound organic firm tofu, patted dry (non-GMO – I used WildWood tofu from Whole Foods)
  • pinch of organic nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp organic turmeric (or if you don’t have turmeric, you can use organic Thyme instead)
  • 1 tbsp dried organic basil
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup organic soy milk (I used organic homemade almond milk using this machine)

***Note about the vegetables used in this recipe. You can substitute the veggies with any other veggies you prefer (i.e.

spinach, zucchini, chard, etc.)

 

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PREPARATION:

 

Pre-heat the oven to 425 degrees.

Heat the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat and sautee the onion, green pepper, broccoli and mushrooms until

cooked, about 8 to 10 minutes.

In a blender or food processor, blend the tofu, nutmeg, turmeric, basil, salt and soy or almond milk until smooth. Stir the

vegetables and the tofu mixture together and add pepper to taste.

Pout the batter into the pie crust. Bake for 30 minutes, or until a knife inserted just off-center into the quiche comes out clean.

 

ENJOY! :)

 

 

Sustainable and Delicious Organic Vegan Butternut Mac & Cheese (aka Roasted Butternut Alfredo) November 29, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — everyonesharvest @ 11:33 pm

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FEATURED RECIPE: Vegan Butternut Mac & Cheese (aka Roasted Butternut Alfredo)

 

DISCLAIMER: the following content does not necessarily represent the beliefs, values and opinions of Everyone’s

Harvest as a whole. These blog posts are written by individuals associated with this organization and are their

personal views of food and our food systems. The sole purpose and mission of Everyone’s Harvest remains the same:

to create vibrant, healthy communities and equitable food webs.” 

 

Recipe by Isa Chandra

Blog and recipe revisions by Chiara Cabiglio, Everyone’s Harvest Intern

You’re probably thinking to yourself that a good old fashioned macaroni and cheese is impossible without, well, cheese.

Think again. This mac and cheese recipe is creamy, delicious, and flavorful, and it looks exactly like mac and cheese, except

it does not have cheese! It has organic, plant-based, whole-grain goodness all in one bite!

Not only is this recipe delicious, but it also is sustainable and environmentally friendly. Perhaps the most important and

spectacular thing about this recipe is that it is in fact a part of the solution to climate change, environmental degradation,

health care, obesity, diabetes, cancer and other diseases, overfishing, energy, global outbreaks such as swine flu, global

depletion, world hunger, species extinction, animal cruelty, and much more. This recipe, including the Fresh Veggie Rolls

with Mango Salsa and Savory Almond Dipping Sauce, Butternut Squash Stuffed with Chard and White Beans, Cashew Cream

and Spinach Stuffed Portobellos, and Penne Pasta with Vegetables, Fresh Herbs, Walnuts and Mozzarella recipes, enable us

to live and eat consciously, sustainably and simply so that others may simply live. So that the human race and future

generations may simply live, as well as the polar bears and thousands of other species that currently are on the brink of

extinction.

The clock is ticking. Let’s vote with our forks! Imagine if more people ate this way. Imagine if more people

ate less meat, fish and dairy, and/or replaced these with better alternatives. Individually and collectively, we would create

positive change and see Mother Earth begin to heal.

So let’s start cooking this delicious and sustainable meal!

Directions:

1/2 pound pasta (see note) (I used two boxes of Andean Dream Organic Quinoa Pasta Gluten and Corn-Free Shells. You can

buy this pasta at Whole Foods).

 

Sauce:
1/2 cup organic cashews, soaked for at least 2 hours
1 1/2 cup organic vegetable broth
1 1/2 cups organic roasted butternut squash (see note) (from your local farmers’ market)
2 tablespoons mellow white miso (non-GMO)
2 tablespoons nutritional yeast (optional)
1 tablespoon fresh organic lemon juice

 

For the rest:
1 tablespoon organic olive oil
1 medium yellow organic onion, quartered and thinly sliced (from your local farmers’ market)
3 cloves organic garlic, minced (from your local farmers’ market)
1 teaspoon dry rubbed organic sage
3/4 cup dry white wine
Several dashes fresh black pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste

about 1/2 cup organic whole-grain breadcrumbs

 

For garnish:
Extra roasted organic squash
Pepitas, or chopped organic pecans, walnuts or hazelnuts

 

Once the squash has roasted, bring a salted pot of water to boil for the pasta. When boiling, cook pasta according to package

directions, drain and set pasta aside in the pot. If you are making the macaroni and cheese, undercook the pasta so that it is

still somewhat firm.

 

Meanwhile, drain the cashews and place them in a blender with the vegetable broth. Blend until very smooth. Rub sauce

between your finger and when hardly any grittiness remains, add the roasted butternut, miso, nutritional yeast (if using) and

lemon juice. Puree until smooth, scraping down the sides with a rubber spatula to make sure you get everything.

 

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

 

While the sauce is blending, start the onions. Preheat a large cast iron pan over medium heat, saute onions in olive oil and a

pinch of salt for about 7 minutes, until lightly browned. Add the garlic and saute for 30 seconds or so, just until fragrant. Mix

in the sage and pepper. Then add the wine and salt and turn the heat up to bring wine to a boil. Let boil for about two

minutes, to reduce a little.

 

Turn down the heat to medium low. Now add the butternut cream to the pan, and stir to incorporate the onions and

everything. Heat through, stirring occasionally, for about 5 minutes. The sauce should thicken a bit. Taste for salt and

seasonings.

 

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Set aside some of the sauce (you can reserve a cup or so for veggies if you’d like to throw some on top.) Pour sauce onto pasta

in pot and stir to coat. Place coated pasta in an oven-safe casserole dish. Top with breadcrumbs. Place dish uncovered in the

oven for about 10-15 minutes.

 

Serve topped with additional roasted squash and a sprinkle of nuts.

 

ENJOY! :)

 

 

MC Gives! Campaign and Everyone’s Harvest November 15, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — everyonesharvest @ 12:10 am

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Blog by Chiara Cabiglio, Everyone’s Harvest Intern

 

Everyone’s Harvest is very excited to announce that we have been selected as a participating nonprofit in this

year’s MC Gives campaign!

 

November 8th marked the official launch of the Gives! Campaign, which runs through December 31st at midnight.

This campaign began with a simple idea: to raise money and awareness for local nonprofits. “Without the more than

1,000 local nonprofits working tirelessly to fulfill their missions — everyday— our community would look and feel

like a very different place. And that wouldn’t be a good thing. We know you understand this and in our nearly

twenty-five years of reporting on the local news, arts and culture, we’ve grown to respect and deeply value the

nonprofit community.

 

More than a decade ago, we decided we could help in addition to our newspaper, by supporting the change local

nonprofits create through our own, and your, philanthropy. We established the Weekly’s Community Fund in 2000 at

the Community Foundation for Monterey County, and have held an annual appeal to our readers since, from

Thanksgiving to New Years Day.” 

 

Please consider donating to Everyone’s Harvest through this program. Organizations receiving donations through

MC Gives will receive a partial match on top of your original donation. Make your dollars go further to help make

possible the continued creation of vibrant, healthy communities and equitable food webs through Everyone’s

Harvest’s four certified farmers’ markets, three community gardens, and the Edible Education program’s healthy

interactive cooking workshops.

 

If you would still like to donate but do not have internet access or are unable to donate by credit card, you may

download and print this form and mail it with a check payable to the Monterey County Weekly Community Fund.

MAIL TO: Monterey County Weekly, 668 Williams Avenue, Seaside, CA 93955.

 

Also, be sure to check Everyone’s Harvest out in the glossy MC GIVES edition of the weekly published this week,

or on the web: Click here (under “Health, Wellness and Food.”)

 

 

 
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